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From enslavement to obliteration Napalm DeathLP

5 Reviews
Napalm Death
Currently in stock
Parcel arrival:  estimated between Tuesday, 29/08/2017 & Monday, 04/09/2017

Product Details

CategoryVinyl
ThemeBands
GenreDeath Metal
Media formatLP
Media PackagingStandard
Available since 21.07.2017
Product code361692

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Written on:

56 reviews

It's fine

It's fine. Napalm Death are undisputed revolutionaries. They gave us a sample of super-fast game, expressive chaos, social problems of songs, and in the field of form - an example of noise segments, the duration of which at best is 1.5 minutes (the exception is a couple of songs for 3 minutes). In my opinion, the best in the early Napalm Death is the punchy energy and the pathos of destruction and anarchy. This is fully reflected in this album. "From Enslavement to Obliteration" is a collection of songs with a number of classical collected works of Marxists. It may seem that the filling of the album is too homogeneous, but such is the classic - these are the pioneers whose mission is to give an example of the musical style of "grindcore" in its most radical manifestation.
Attention is drawn to the epic introduction of "Evolved as One" in which Lee Dorrian reads the unchanged position from the time of "Scum": long live freedom (physical and spiritual), down with exploitation, oppression by the dominant social consciousness. And then, starting with "It's a M.A.N.S World!" - a series of destructive language with a frenzied rhythm, only occasionally slowing down its movement. My favorite is the title "From Enslavement to Obliteration". There are no failing "songs" at all and (this is obvious) can not be. The vocals of Lee Dorrian are horribly brutal and absolutely indecipherable. As soon as someone turned the language to call Bill Steer's riffs "the standard of primitive"? Nothing of the kind is the specificity of the style. Sometimes he plays superfast (the fastest thing on the album is "Mentally Murdered"), sometimes he plays at a slower pace, but is very powerful and impressive ("Unchallenged Hate", the title track), and sometimes pampers the listener with his branded distorted soloks, rushing to In the unknown ("Uncertainty Blurs the Vision", "Think for a Minute", "Emotional Suffocation"). Well, the blasts of Mick Harris, the inexpressible words of drumming riot and his auxiliary vocals - this is one of the leading arguments in favor of this disc.
Conclusion. The second album Napalm Death - unconditional ten, Mick Harris - a medal for courage.

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Written on:

56 reviews

It's fine

It's fine. Napalm Death are undisputed revolutionaries. They gave us a sample of super-fast game, expressive chaos, social problems of songs, and in the field of form - an example of noise segments, the duration of which at best is 1.5 minutes (the exception is a couple of songs for 3 minutes). In my opinion, the best in the early Napalm Death is the punchy energy and the pathos of destruction and anarchy. This is fully reflected in this album. "From Enslavement to Obliteration" is a collection of songs with a number of classical collected works of Marxists. It may seem that the filling of the album is too homogeneous, but such is the classic - these are the pioneers whose mission is to give an example of the musical style of "grindcore" in its most radical manifestation.
Attention is drawn to the epic introduction of "Evolved as One" in which Lee Dorrian reads the unchanged position from the time of "Scum": long live freedom (physical and spiritual), down with exploitation, oppression by the dominant social consciousness. And then, starting with "It's a M.A.N.S World!" - a series of destructive language with a frenzied rhythm, only occasionally slowing down its movement. My favorite is the title "From Enslavement to Obliteration". There are no failing "songs" at all and (this is obvious) can not be. The vocals of Lee Dorrian are horribly brutal and absolutely indecipherable. As soon as someone turned the language to call Bill Steer's riffs "the standard of primitive"? Nothing of the kind is the specificity of the style. Sometimes he plays superfast (the fastest thing on the album is "Mentally Murdered"), sometimes he plays at a slower pace, but is very powerful and impressive ("Unchallenged Hate", the title track), and sometimes pampers the listener with his branded distorted soloks, rushing to In the unknown ("Uncertainty Blurs the Vision", "Think for a Minute", "Emotional Suffocation"). Well, the blasts of Mick Harris, the inexpressible words of drumming riot and his auxiliary vocals - this is one of the leading arguments in favor of this disc.
Conclusion. The second album Napalm Death - unconditional ten, Miku Harris - a medal for courage.

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Enter your comment below:

Written on:

56 reviews

It's fine

It's fine. Napalm Death are undisputed revolutionaries. They gave us a sample of super-fast game, expressive chaos, social problems of songs, and in the field of form - an example of noise segments, the duration of which at best is 1.5 minutes (the exception is a couple of songs for 3 minutes). In my opinion, the best in the early Napalm Death is the punchy energy and the pathos of destruction and anarchy. This is fully reflected in this album. "From Enslavement to Obliteration" is a collection of songs with a number of classical collected works of Marxists. It may seem that the filling of the album is too homogeneous, but such is the classic - these are the pioneers whose mission is to give an example of the musical style of "grindcore" in its most radical manifestation.
Attention is drawn to the epic introduction of "Evolved as One" in which Lee Dorrian reads the unchanged position from the time of "Scum": long live freedom (physical and spiritual), down with exploitation, oppression by the dominant social consciousness. And then, starting with "It's a M.A.N.S World!" - a series of destructive language with a frenzied rhythm, only occasionally slowing down its movement. My favorite is the title "From Enslavement to Obliteration". There are no failing "songs" at all and (this is obvious) can not be. The vocals of Lee Dorrian are horribly brutal and absolutely indecipherable. As soon as someone turned the language to call Bill Steer's riffs "the standard of primitive"? Nothing of the kind is the specificity of the style. Sometimes he plays superfast (the fastest thing on the album is "Mentally Murdered"), sometimes he plays at a slower pace, but is very powerful and impressive ("Unchallenged Hate", the title track), and sometimes pampers the listener with his branded distorted soloks, rushing to In the unknown ("Uncertainty Blurs the Vision", "Think for a Minute", "Emotional Suffocation"). Well, the blasts of Mick Harris, the inexpressible words of drumming riot and his auxiliary vocals - this is one of the leading arguments in favor of this disc.
Conclusion. The second album Napalm Death - unconditional ten, Mick Harris - a medal for courage.

Was this review helpful to you?

Enter your comment below:

Written on:

56 reviews

It's fine

It's fine. Napalm Death are undisputed revolutionaries. They gave us a sample of super-fast game, expressive chaos, social problems of songs, and in the field of form - an example of noise segments, the duration of which at best is 1.5 minutes (the exception is a couple of songs for 3 minutes). In my opinion, the best in the early Napalm Death is the punchy energy and the pathos of destruction and anarchy. This is fully reflected in this album. "From Enslavement to Obliteration" is a collection of songs with a number of classical collected works of Marxists. It may seem that the filling of the album is too homogeneous, but such is the classic - these are the pioneers whose mission is to give an example of the musical style of "grindcore" in its most radical manifestation.
Attention is drawn to the epic introduction of "Evolved as One" in which Lee Dorrian reads the unchanged position from the time of "Scum": long live freedom (physical and spiritual), down with exploitation, oppression by the dominant social consciousness. And then, starting with "It's a M.A.N.S World!" - a series of destructive language with a frenzied rhythm, only occasionally slowing down its movement. My favorite is the title "From Enslavement to Obliteration". There are no failing "songs" at all and (this is obvious) can not be. The vocals of Lee Dorrian are horribly brutal and absolutely indecipherable. As soon as someone turned the language to call Bill Steer's riffs "the standard of primitive"? Nothing of the kind is the specificity of the style. Sometimes he plays superfast (the fastest thing on the album is "Mentally Murdered"), sometimes he plays at a slower pace, but is very powerful and impressive ("Unchallenged Hate", the title track), and sometimes pampers the listener with his branded distorted soloks, rushing to In the unknown ("Uncertainty Blurs the Vision", "Think for a Minute", "Emotional Suffocation"). Well, the blasts of Mick Harris, the inexpressible words of drumming riot and his auxiliary vocals - this is one of the leading arguments in favor of this disc.
Conclusion. The second album Napalm Death - unconditional ten, Mick Harris - a medal for courage.

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Written on:

7 reviews

Grind at its best

From Enslavement to Obliteration is an album that scares the piss outta me. It's like walking through a grave and stepping across the bones, and with each time you feel like you've been mentally scared. Compared to Scum, this album's production has increased by a long shot, and it doesn't feel 100% muddy. And the drums and guitars are evenly distinguished, instead of thinking they sound similar.

Although the album opener "Evolved as One" is a brutal doom metal number (perhaps foreshadowing singer Lee Dorian's Cathedral project, which he formed after leaving Napalm Death), the majority of this album is a blur of unhinged grindcore featuring Mick Harris' flurry of percussion, Dorian's maniacal grunts and entirely obfuscated guitar riffs. For those who like their songs to have a great deal of variety and distinction, this is not the record for you. At this point, Napalm Death made Sodom look like the pinnacle of polished arena rock. Napalm Death apparently aspired to created some of the ugliest music in existence and it's safe to say they came quite close, particularly in the context of 1988's music world. Tone Loc, this ain't.
It's fortunate this album has such a short running time. I can't imagine anyone, including the most dedicated grindcore fans in the world, wanting to hear this style for upwards of an hour. The CD version includes the brief The Curse EP as bonus tracks (two of which last all of seven seconds, which is plenty now that I think about it). Much like Scum before it, I find From Enslavement to Obliteration to be an amusing sideshow to the general heavy metal underground scene of the late 80s, but it's also hard to imagine being so into the band that I'd spend hours looking at their liner notes and thinking deep, academic thoughts about exactly what they were trying to express in their music.

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